Winnemem Wintu Voice

winnememwintuvoice:

Make Strong (Shasta Dam version)

Hawai’ian singer/songwriter Hawane Rios shared this beautiful song during her visit to McCloud River country, and she gave us permission to use it to oppose the raising of Shasta Dam.

On Hawane’s Hawai’i Island her people are standing against the desecration of their sacred mountain, Mauna Kea, by the planned construction of an 18-story telescope.

– Music by Hawane Rios
– Video by Will Doolittle

Artist Satement:
“Make Strong” was written in honor of all the people around the world who are choosing to stand up for what they believe in positivity and love. “Make Strong” was inspired by the words of Papa Mau Pialug, who taught us how to voyage again, “make strong like a mountain”. It is my tribute to the Winnemem Wintu and their journey to protect their ceremonial sites.
– na Hāwane

Help to stop the Shasta Dam Raise:
shastadamraise.com

Help to protect, Mauna Kea, sacred mountain on Hawai’i Island:
KAHEA.org

More Music by Hawane:
reverbnation.com

Follow Hawane:
Facebook: Hawane Rios
Twitter: @hawanemusic
Tumblr: hawanemusic
iTunes: hawane-rios

— San Francisco —Water, Land & Cultural Survival  —  BenefitWinnemem Wintu — Chochenyo OhloneSpecial Guest Artist: Hawane RiosFilms: Beyond Recognition  |  Standing on Sacred Ground–Pilgrims & Tourists Saturday, August 2ndsSpeakers:Corrina Gould, Chochenyo Ohlone   |   Chief Caleen Sisk, Winnemem Wintu

— San Francisco —

Water, Land & Cultural Survival  — Benefit
Winnemem Wintu — Chochenyo Ohlone
Special Guest Artist: Hawane Rios
Films:

B
eyond Recognition  |  Standing on Sacred Ground–Pilgrims & Tourists
Saturday, August 2nd
s
Speakers:
Corrina Gould, Chochenyo Ohlone   |   Chief Caleen Sisk, Winnemem Wintu

CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS

Deadline Monday: Take a moment to make your feelings known!
Tell Governor Brown to BAN FRACKING NOW.

Governor Brown has proposed a revised draft of his terrible fracking regulations, which continue to greenlight expanded oil fracking in California — ignoring the more than 100,000 public comments calling for a ban on fracking that Californians submitted on the last draft of the regulations.
On July 7, Brown’s administration was forced to shut down 11 oil and gas waste injection sites over fears that they are contaminating drinking water in the Central Valley with fracking chemicals.

kaila-farrell-smith:

Kaila Farrell-Smith
TAKTAKL’ I  G’ EE LA (Red Earth, Klamath)
Oil paint, oil ground, wax crayons & spray paint on 6 (18” x 24”) wood panels on 12 ft. Red Cedar Shelf, 2014.
Installation at ROCKSBOXCONTEMPORARYFINEART Gallery June 2014.
CADRE PSU MFA in Contemporary Art Practices Graduates group show
Exhibit/Room Title:

 TAKTAKL’I

 Exhibit Statement:


Two seasons ago HéyÓka appeared at my camp.  We were lit by the red emerging from the ceremonial fire and there I learned about Trickster and the sacred jester of opposite. HéyÓka told me stories about the kettle ceremony where he got his medicine and then he spun his thunder stick and during the third round on the third day the rain came in rich storm clouds braking the thickness of heat and it poured down on the Sundancers.   I glimpsed powerful temporalities only perceived by HéyÓka and the boundaries of the stone people opened for his medicine to pass through. When I closed my eyes at the cedar draped arbor HéyÓka’s face was staring at me, upside down, yet right side up and masked.  HéyÓka was staring at my spirit, at the place where my spirit resides and I was singing. Then, when I opened my eyes HéyÓka was gone and my consciousness was impregnated with fascination for this entity of contrary’ Ness[1].

The painting and sculptural installations of TAKTAKL’ I explore Indigenous interpretations of TAKTAKL’ I (Klamath or Mak’ Lak word for Red) in an effort to reclaim shifting postcolonial spaces. Two paradigms are bridged when traditional materials imbued with spiritual and functional meaning meet techniques hi-jacked from western european-north american art histories.  The dichotomies represented by traditional American Indian art forms and western influenced mark making stimulate dialogue within an Indigenous: settler/colonizers binary[2], making transparent violent, beautiful, and complicated legacies. Contemplating the idea of TAKTAKL’I first from an Indigenous paradigm and then through a western gaze, allows this problematic binary to emerge, illuminating the contrary nature of these conflicting worldviews.
The source material that inspires Kaila Farrell-Smith’s work references contemporary Indigenous gaps of knowledge due to legacies of cultural genocide and colonialism, such as loss of languages and displacement from ancestral homelands. Kaila Farrell-Smith evolves visual languages that communicate past essentialist notions of pan-native americanisms, by bridging Indigenous knowledge and perpetuating cultural art forms and meaning. Employing both the deconstruction and reconstruction of language, mark’s and color function as contextualization of visual disharmony, erasure, defacement, and violent disruptions, that pair and transform into passages of balance and zones of refuge. 

[1] Using the capitalized [’Ness] is a reference to Eduardo Duran’s writing, which imbues a sense of “humanness” to terms, objects, spaces that are not regarded as incarnate in a western paradigm.


[2] Term comes from the essay: Smith, Andrea. “Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy.” GLOBAL DIALOGUE Volume 12, Number 2. Summer/Autumn 2010, Race and Racisms. Print. Page 5.





Welcome to Tumblr Kaila Farrell-Smith!

kaila-farrell-smith:

Kaila Farrell-Smith

TAKTAKL’ I  G’ EE LA (Red Earth, Klamath)

Oil paint, oil ground, wax crayons & spray paint on 6 (18” x 24”) wood panels on 12 ft. Red Cedar Shelf, 2014.

Installation at ROCKSBOXCONTEMPORARYFINEART Gallery June 2014.

CADRE PSU MFA in Contemporary Art Practices Graduates group show

Exhibit/Room Title:

 TAKTAKL’I

 Exhibit Statement:

Two seasons ago HéyÓka appeared at my camp.  We were lit by the red emerging from the ceremonial fire and there I learned about Trickster and the sacred jester of opposite. HéyÓka told me stories about the kettle ceremony where he got his medicine and then he spun his thunder stick and during the third round on the third day the rain came in rich storm clouds braking the thickness of heat and it poured down on the Sundancers.   I glimpsed powerful temporalities only perceived by HéyÓka and the boundaries of the stone people opened for his medicine to pass through. When I closed my eyes at the cedar draped arbor HéyÓka’s face was staring at me, upside down, yet right side up and masked.  HéyÓka was staring at my spirit, at the place where my spirit resides and I was singing. Then, when I opened my eyes HéyÓka was gone and my consciousness was impregnated with fascination for this entity of contrary’ Ness[1].

The painting and sculptural installations of TAKTAKL’ I explore Indigenous interpretations of TAKTAKL’ I (Klamath or Mak’ Lak word for Red) in an effort to reclaim shifting postcolonial spaces. Two paradigms are bridged when traditional materials imbued with spiritual and functional meaning meet techniques hi-jacked from western european-north american art histories.  The dichotomies represented by traditional American Indian art forms and western influenced mark making stimulate dialogue within an Indigenous: settler/colonizers binary[2], making transparent violent, beautiful, and complicated legacies. Contemplating the idea of TAKTAKL’I first from an Indigenous paradigm and then through a western gaze, allows this problematic binary to emerge, illuminating the contrary nature of these conflicting worldviews.

The source material that inspires Kaila Farrell-Smith’s work references contemporary Indigenous gaps of knowledge due to legacies of cultural genocide and colonialism, such as loss of languages and displacement from ancestral homelands. Kaila Farrell-Smith evolves visual languages that communicate past essentialist notions of pan-native americanisms, by bridging Indigenous knowledge and perpetuating cultural art forms and meaning. Employing both the deconstruction and reconstruction of language, mark’s and color function as contextualization of visual disharmony, erasure, defacement, and violent disruptions, that pair and transform into passages of balance and zones of refuge.



[1] Using the capitalized [’Ness] is a reference to Eduardo Duran’s writing, which imbues a sense of “humanness” to terms, objects, spaces that are not regarded as incarnate in a western paradigm.

[2] Term comes from the essay: Smith, Andrea. “Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy.” GLOBAL DIALOGUE Volume 12, Number 2. Summer/Autumn 2010, Race and Racisms. Print. Page 5.

Welcome to Tumblr Kaila Farrell-Smith!

winnememwintuvoice:

Don’t Drown Our Culture!

The latest video, sharing what will be lost if Shasta Dam is raised.
PLEASE SHARE, and TAKE ACTION.
Let your federal legislators know that they should “Oppose the Plan to Raise Shasta Dam!”

In case you missed this the first time.

Don’t Drown Our Culture!

The latest video, sharing what will be lost if Shasta Dam is raised.
PLEASE SHARE, and TAKE ACTION.
Let your federal legislators know that they should “Oppose the Plan to Raise Shasta Dam!”

Pua Case, representing for Indigenous Hawai’i!

Pua Case, representing for Indigenous Hawai’i!

What does Indigenous sovereignty look like?  Here’s one way it’s done…

http://unistotencamp.com/

save-wiyabi-project:

Frank Waln addressing rape culture & male responsibility.

save-wiyabi-project:

Frank Waln addressing rape culture & male responsibility.

anishinaabequay:

"You Can’t Always Get What You Want," Ric Gendron (Arrow Lake Colville)

anishinaabequay:

"You Can’t Always Get What You Want," Ric Gendron (Arrow Lake Colville)

tvoltage:

bassfanimation:

cumber-porn:

princcehans:

overnight-shipping:

there-isnofate-but-whatwemake:

heyitsmario:

harrishun:

omomon:

mitzi—may:

If you see something like this, DO NOT CALL AN EXTERMINATOR!
Call a beekeeper, they can relocate the hive instead of killing them. Bees are dying at an alarming rate, please do not contribute to that! They are so important for our ecosystem!


yo fuck this i aint gonna call no beekeeper i’m moving before i’m dead

I’m going to call an exterminator so the exterminator can kill them. I’ll be able to sleep at night knowing that there are less bees in the world.

No bees = no food.
No food = no life.
Congratulations on destroying the world.

Because you seem to not understand that bees pollinate flowers and literally bees are the reason we have food.

Did you guys even watch bee movie

you really really must call a bee keeper!

My family’s house had it’s entire attic taken over by bees one year. They slowly started appearing in the house, and then they were everywhere.  We called a bee keeper, and he removed what he said was the largest domestic honeycomb/bee nest he’d ever seen.  I was so terrified I’d gone to stay with a friend.  My folks called me to meet the bee keeper, and he led me on the most magical journey through the house.  He explained the bees were harmless if you move calmly through them and don’t swat at or harass them.  He was only stung once because he accidentally put his hand down and smooshed one.  The bees landed on me, walked a bit, then buzzed away.  All honey combs and bees were safely removed and relocated.  Call a bee keeper, they are awesome!

tvoltage:

bassfanimation:

cumber-porn:

princcehans:

overnight-shipping:

there-isnofate-but-whatwemake:

heyitsmario:

harrishun:

omomon:

mitzi—may:

If you see something like this, DO NOT CALL AN EXTERMINATOR!

Call a beekeeper, they can relocate the hive instead of killing them. Bees are dying at an alarming rate, please do not contribute to that! They are so important for our ecosystem!

yo fuck this i aint gonna call no beekeeper i’m moving before i’m dead

I’m going to call an exterminator so the exterminator can kill them. I’ll be able to sleep at night knowing that there are less bees in the world.

No bees = no food.

No food = no life.

Congratulations on destroying the world.

Because you seem to not understand that bees pollinate flowers and literally bees are the reason we have food.

Did you guys even watch bee movie

you really really must call a bee keeper!

My family’s house had it’s entire attic taken over by bees one year. They slowly started appearing in the house, and then they were everywhere.  We called a bee keeper, and he removed what he said was the largest domestic honeycomb/bee nest he’d ever seen.  I was so terrified I’d gone to stay with a friend.  My folks called me to meet the bee keeper, and he led me on the most magical journey through the house.  He explained the bees were harmless if you move calmly through them and don’t swat at or harass them.  He was only stung once because he accidentally put his hand down and smooshed one.  The bees landed on me, walked a bit, then buzzed away.  All honey combs and bees were safely removed and relocated.  Call a bee keeper, they are awesome!

rebelbits:

After our house burned down in Wisconsin a few months ago, my husband and I packed our four young kids and all our belongings into a gold minivan and drove to my sister-in-law’s place, just outside of Atlanta. On the back windshield, we pasted six stick figures: a dad, a mom, three young girls, and one baby boy.

Baby Bou Bou

That minivan was sitting in the front driveway of my sister-in-law’s place the night a SWAT team broke in, looking for a small amount of drugs they thought my husband’s nephew had. Some of my kids’ toys were in the front yard, but the officers claimed they had no way of knowing children might be present. Our whole family was sleeping in the same room, one bed for us, one for the girls, and a crib.

After the SWAT team broke down the door, they threw a flashbang grenade inside. It landed in my son’s crib.

Flashbang grenades were created for soldiers to use during battle. When they explode, the noise is so loud and the flash is so bright that anyone close by is temporarily blinded and deafened. It’s been three weeks since the flashbang exploded next to my sleeping baby, and he’s still covered in burns.

There’s still a hole in his chest that exposes his ribs. At least that’s what I’ve been told; I’m afraid to look.

My husband’s nephew, the one they were looking for, wasn’t there. He doesn’t even live in that house. After breaking down the door, throwing my husband to the ground, and screaming at my children, the officers – armed with M16s – filed through the house like they were playing war. They searched for drugs and never found any.

I heard my baby wailing and asked one of the officers to let me hold him. He screamed at me to sit down and shut up and blocked my view, so I couldn’t see my son. I could see a singed crib. And I could see a pool of blood. The officers yelled at me to calm down and told me my son was fine, that he’d just lost a tooth. It was only hours later when they finally let us drive to the hospital that we found out Bou Bou was in the intensive burn unit and that he’d been placed into a medically induced coma.

For the last three weeks, my husband and I have been sleeping at the hospital. We tell our son that we love him and we’ll never leave him behind. His car seat is still in the minivan, right where it’s always been, and we whisper to him that soon we’ll be taking him home with us.

Every morning, I have to face the reality that my son is fighting for his life. It’s not clear whether he’ll live or die. All of this to find a small amount of drugs?

The only silver lining I can possibly see is that my baby Bou Bou’s story might make us angry enough that we stop accepting brutal SWAT raids as a normal way to fight the “war on drugs.” I know that this has happened to other families, here in Georgia and across the country. I know that SWAT teams are breaking into homes in the middle of the night, more often than not just to serve search warrants in drug cases. I know that too many local cops have stockpiled weapons that were made for soldiers to take to war. And as is usually the case with aggressive policing, I know that people of color and poor people are more likely to be targeted. I know these things because of the American Civil Liberties Union’s new report, and because I’m working with them to push for restraints on the use of SWAT.

A few nights ago, my 8-year-old woke up in the middle of the night screaming, “No, don’t kill him! You’re hurting my brother! Don’t kill him.” How can I ever make that go away? I used to tell my kids that if they were ever in trouble, they should go to the police for help. Now my kids don’t want to go to sleep at night because they’re afraid the cops will kill them or their family. It’s time to remind the cops that they should be serving and protecting our neighborhoods, not waging war on the people in them.

—-

by Alecia Phonesavanh

http://www.salon.com/2014/06/24/a_swat_team_blew_a_hole_in_my_2_year_old_son/

Luta (Wicahpiluta Candelaria) makes his first public statement after being beaten by San Leandro police:

I would like to thank everyone from the bottom of my heart for all your love & continued support thru What is one of the most difficult times in my life. Shiruru. I was released this morning from santa rita. I am in pain throughout my body. But in decent Spirit. Resting in the village of Huchuin. I am still a bit emotionally unstable & bit dazed About all of this. I’ll be making an official report to my Beautiful community as to the incident that took place this last Friday very soon. I just need a day or to get it together and take care of my medical issues. Xrays show I have a small fracture around my left eye and a larger fracture over my right eye. With some visual & hearing impairment. Damaged cartalidge on my nose. cuts & bruises And major neck & back pain. The swelling on my face has gone down significantly. Don’t be afraid to laugh it heals us all. The inmates said I look like the Raider patch. Lol Our strength as human beings come from gathering around eachother to support against these injustices. Thank thank thank you to all. Much Love ~Wicahpiluta Candelaria~
Facebook link

Luta (Wicahpiluta Candelaria) makes his first public statement after being beaten by San Leandro police:

I would like to thank everyone from the bottom of my heart for all your love & continued support thru What is one of the most difficult times in my life.
Shiruru.
I was released this morning from santa rita. I am in pain throughout my body. But in decent Spirit. Resting in the village of Huchuin. I am still a bit emotionally unstable & bit dazed About all of this. I’ll be making an official report to my Beautiful community as to the incident that took place this last Friday very soon. I just need a day or to get it together and take care of my medical issues.
Xrays show I have a small fracture around my left eye and a larger fracture over my right eye. With some visual & hearing impairment. Damaged cartalidge on my nose. cuts & bruises And major neck & back pain. The swelling on my face has gone down significantly.
Don’t be afraid to laugh it heals us all. The inmates said I look like the Raider patch. Lol
Our strength as human beings come from gathering around eachother to support against these injustices. Thank thank thank you to all. Much Love ~Wicahpiluta Candelaria~

Facebook link

June 22, 2014

via Laura Cedillo: Our Friend/Warrior, Wicahpiluta Candelaria, Luta, was the victim of Police Brutality on Friday night and continues to be in custody. We are looking for folks to assist in contributing to his legal defense.

SIGNAL BOOST — Supporters needed at the arraignment tomorrow.